Essay Introduction Lines For Speech

15 Ways to Start a Speech + Bonus Tips

You have heard the saying “First impressions are lasting; you never get a second chance to create a good first impression.”

The same is true when talking about how to start a speech…

The truth is, when you start your speech, you must focus everything on making a positive first impression on your audience members.

Here are 15 different ways to start a speech as well as 2 extra BONUS tips at the end.

1) Thank the Organizers and Audience

You can start by thanking the audience for coming and thanking the organization for inviting you to speak.

Refer to the person who introduced you or to one or more of the senior people in the organization in the audience.

This compliments them, makes the feel proud and happy about your presence, and connects you to the audience like an electrical plug in a socket.

2) Start With a Positive Statement

You can begin by telling the audience members how much they will like and enjoy what you have to say.

For example, you might say:

“You’re really going to enjoy the time we spend together this evening. I’m going to share with you some of the most important ideas that have ever been discovered in this area.”

Remember that speaking is an art, so be an artist and take complete control of your performance,

3) Compliment the Audience

You can begin by complimenting the audience members sincerely and with great respect.

Smile as if you are really glad to see them as if they are all old friends of yours that you have not seen for quite a while.

You can tell them that it is a great honor for you to be here, that they are some of the most important people in this business or industry, and that you are looking forward to sharing some key ideas with them.

You could say something like:

“It is an honor to be here with you today. You are the elite, the top 10 percent of people in this industry. Only the very best people in any field will take the time and make the sacrifice to come so far for a conference like this.”

4) Start Your Speech By Referring to Current Events

Use a current event front-page news story to transition into your subject and to illustrate or prove your point. You can bring a copy of the newspaper and hold it up as you refer to it in your introduction.

This visual image of you holding the paper and reciting or reading a key point rivets the audience’s attention and causes people to lean forward to hear what you have to say.

 

 

5) Refer to a Historical Event

For many years, I studied military history…

Especially the lives and campaigns of the great generals and the decisive battles they won. One of my favorites was Alexander the Great.

One day, I was asked to give a talk on leadership principles to a roomful of managers for a Fortune 500 company.

I decided that the campaign of Alexander the Great against Darius of Persia would make an excellent story that would illustrate the leadership qualities of one of the great commanders in history.

I opened my talk with these words:

“Once upon a time there was a young man named Alex who grew up in a poor country. But Alex was a little bit ambitious. From an early age, he decided that he wanted to conquer the entire known world. But there was a small problem. Most of the known world was under the control of a huge multinational called the Persian Empire, headed by King Darius II. To fulfill his ambition, Alex was going to have to take the market share away from the market leader, who was very determined to hold on to it.

This is the same situation that exists between you and your major competitors in the market today. You are going to have to use all your leadership skills to win the great marketing battles of the future.”

6) Refer to a Well Known Person

You can start by quoting a well-known person or publication that recently made an important statement.

One of the subjects I touch upon regularly is the importance of continual personal development.

I will say something like, “In the twenty-first century, knowledge and know-how are the keys to success. As basketball coach Pat Riley said, ‘If you are not getting better, you are getting worse.’”

7) Refer to a Recent Conversation

Start by telling a story about a recent conversation with someone in attendance.

For instance, I might say, “A few minutes ago, I was taking with Tom Robinson in the lobby. He told me that this is one of the very best times to be working in this industry, and I agree.”

8) Make a Shocking Statement

You can start your talk by making a shocking statement of some kind.

For example, you might say something like:

“According to a recent study, there will be more change, more competition, and more opportunities in this industry in the next year than ever before. And 72 percent of the people in this room will be doing something different within two years if they do not rapidly adapt top these changes.”

Click here If you want to learn more techniques to wow your audience.

9) Quote From Recent Research

You can start by quoting a recent research report.

One example is:

“According to a story in a recent issue of Businessweek, there were almost 10,000,000 millionaires in America in 2013, most of them self-made.”

10) Start Your Speech By Giving Them Hope

The French philosopher Gustav Le Bon once wrote, “The only religion of mankind is, and always has been hope.”

When you speak effectively, you give people hope of some kind.

Remember, the ultimate purpose of speaking is to inspire people to do things that they would not have done in the absence of your comments.

Everything you say should relate to the actions you want people to take and the reasons that they should take those actions.

11) Be Entertaining

Bill Gove used to walk onto the stage after his introduction if he had just finished talking to someone on the side and was breaking off to give his talk to the group.

The audience got the feeling that his entire talk was one continuous conversation.

Bill would often go to the edge of the stage and then drop his voice in a conspiratorial way, open his arms, and beckon the audience members to come a little closer.

He would say, “Come here, let me tell you something,” and then he would wave them forward as though he was about to tell a secret to the entire room.

The amazing thing was that everyone in the room would lean forward to hear this “secret” that he was about to share. People would all suddenly realize what they were doing and break out in laughter. It was a wonderful device to get the audience into the palm of his hands.

12) Ask a Question

You can open by making a positive statement and then ask a question requiring a show of hands.

Try something like this:

“This is a great time to be alive and in business in America. By the way how many people here are self-employed?”

When I asked the crowd this question at a recent speech.

Raise your hand to indicate what you want people to do. I have used this line, and after a number of hands go up, I then say to someone who raised their hand in the front, “How many people here are really self-employed?”

Invariably, someone will say, “We all are!”

I then compliment and affirm the answer:

“You’re right! We are all self-employed, from the time we take our first jobs to the day that we retire; we all work for ourselves, no matter who signs our paychecks.”

13) Open With a Problem

You can start with a problem that must be solved. If it is a problem that almost everyone has in common, you will immediately have the audience’s complete and undivided attention.

For example, you could say:

“Fully 63 percent of baby boomers are moving toward retirement without enough money put aside to provide for themselves for as long as they are going to live. We must address this problem and take action immediately to ensure that each person who retires will be able to live comfortably for the rest of his or her natural life.”

14) Make a Strong Statement, Then Ask a Question

You can start by making a strong statement and then ask a question. You then follow with an answer and ask another question. This gets people immediately involved and listening to your every word.

Here’s an example:

“Twenty percent of the people in our society make 80 percent of the money. Are you a member of the top 20 percent? If not, would you like to join the top 20 percent or even the top 10 percent? Well, in the next few minutes, I am going to give you some ideas to help you become some of the highest-paid people in our society. Would that be a good goal for our time together today?”

15) Tell a Story

You can start your talk with a story. Some of the most powerful words grab the complete attention of the audience are, “Once upon a time…”

From infancy and early childhood, people love stories of any kind. When you start off with the words, “Once upon a time…” you tell the audience that a story is coming. People immediately settle down, become quiet, and lean forward like kids around a campfire.

When I conduct full-day seminars and I want to bring people back to their seats after a break, I will say loudly, “Once upon a time there was a man, right here in this city…”

As soon as I say these words, people hurry back to their seats and begin to listen attentively to the rest of the story.

The story technique is very effective.

In fact, its probably one of the best public speaking tips I’ve learned to this day.

Bonus Tip: Tell Them About Yourself

Very often, I will start a speech to a business, sales, or entrepreneurial group by saying, “I started off without graduating from high school. My family had no money. Everything I accomplished in life I had to do on my own with very little help from anyone else.”

It is amazing how many people come up to me after a talk that began with those words and tells me that was their experience as well.

They tell me that they could immediately identify with me because they too had started with poor grades and limited funds, as most people do. As a result, they were open to the rest of my talk, even a full-day seminar, and felt that everything I said was more valid and authentic than if I had been a person who started off with a successful background.

Building a bridge like this is very helpful in bringing the audience onto your side.

Bonus Tip: Get Them Talking to One Another

You can ask people to turn to the person next to them to discuss a particular point.

For instance, you could say:

“Tell the person next to you what you would like to learn from this seminar.”

Whatever you ask your audience members to do, within reason, they will do it for you. Your commands and your leadership will easily influence them, as long as you ask them with confidence.

By following any one of these tips for starting your speech, you are sure to grab your audience’s attention every time.

For more of my best tips, blogs, and videos for speakers, visit my public speaking resource page.

How do you start a speech? Let me know in the comments.

 

 

If you want to create a stellar ending to your speech take a look at my blog “9 Tips to End a Speech With a Bang.”

Summary

Article Name

How to Start a Speech (15 Ways)

Description

You have one chance to make a great impression with your audience. Follow any of these 15 tips to make sure you start your speech with a bang!

Author

Brian Tracy

Publisher Name

Brian Tracy International

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About Brian Tracy — Brian is recognized as the top sales training and personal success authority in the world today. He has authored more than 60 books and has produced more than 500 audio and video learning programs on sales, management, business success and personal development, including worldwide bestseller The Psychology of Achievement. Brian's goal is to help you achieve your personal and business goals faster and easier than you ever imagined. You can follow him on Google+, Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Linkedin and Youtube.

Content of this article

  1. Classification
  2. Speech structure
  3. Tips for writing a good speech
  4. Sample for speakers

How To Write A Speech (Complete Guide)

Giving a speech is not as easy as some natural orators make it to be. It requires adequate preparation as well as planning and in some cases it is easier to order the speech at ghostwriting service. Even the good speakers get it wrong sometimes and find themselves giving the wrong speech or deviating from the theme of an event. People only get the part where someone walks before an audience and delivers whatever they have written down or whatever the Teleprompters have. However, speeches are first written and this is the point where things often go wrong. While preparing a speech entails reading and working on oneself, that is, audibility and confidence, writing a speech calls for a good mastery of language and also requires writers to equip themselves with enough vocabulary. Speeches can be formal and informal, but in both occasions, prior preparation is needed. People often take for granted the aspect of preparation, but as many have found out the hard way, preparation spares one of the embarrassments of getting something as obvious facts wrong.

The first step to writing a good speech is choosing the right or appropriate topic. All good speeches aim at passing some information to the audience. The information must be relevant or be in line with the occasion or the theme of the event. Some audiences can be intimidating, and if one chooses the wrong topic for an event, the result will entail a bored audience as well as a shuttered self-esteem to some orators. Some people have developed phobias simply because of having chosen the wrong topic for their speech. While some audiences are forgiving, others might even get offensive and ask the speaker to leave the stage. Topic selection is thus an important ingredient to giving a good speech. One of the obvious instructions when choosing a topic is to make sure that it is relevant to the event and appeals to the audience’s interests.

Speech classification

There are different types of speeches, and it is essential that speakers understand when to give which one. They include:

Each of the above is given on a different occasion and understanding the theme of an event is crucial. A demonstrative speech aims at educating an audience about an idea/object or phenomenon. Speakers who give demonstrative speeches also make use of presentations that include the use of pictures as well as designs that help to reinforce the message. An informative speech is almost the same as a demonstrative speech but differs in the fact that it does not make use of demonstrations. When giving an informative speech, speakers talk extensively about objects, events, processes, or concepts and this ensures that their message is delivered. On the other hand, a persuasive speech seeks to persuade the audience. Speakers giving this kind of speech aim at convincing their audience that their opinion is indeed factual and credible. Finally, an entertaining speech aims at amusing people and helps to create a happy mood. These are often given in graduation and wedding ceremonies.

Every speech must have a purpose/thesis or an underlying message that the speaker aims at delivering to their audience. When writing a speech, it is important to define the message that one intends to pass clearly. Whether it was an assignment at school or a speech at a wedding or an organization’s annual meeting, the writer must ensure that they write their speech around the specific message that they wish to pass. Understanding the type of speech one is required to give is the first step to finding a thesis for a speech. The above provides writers with a starting point because it makes their end goal clear, that is, write to entertain, or to educate or persuade. The thesis must hence be established first before the writer delves into writing the entire speech.

A speech outline is of great importance and guides the writer on what they need to do while writing the different sections. As with any piece of writing, mostly essays, the format is the same, that is, introduction, body, and finally a conclusion. Each of these sections aim at developing the central theme of the speech.

Typical speech structure

Introduction

In the introduction, the writer needs to briefly but clearly establish the message or underlying theme of their speech. Audiences differ, and while some might stick around for the entire speech, a majority expects to hear the speakers theme in the introduction.

Thesis

A thesis carries the speech’s message or theme. If left out, the speech would be flat which lacks a sense of direction or purpose. If for example, the speech written is about a suicide bombing that took place in the market, the thesis statement can be about how the world can foster peace and insist on love.

Regardless of the events at the market, it is important for the world to consider a strategy that is not aimed at ending more lives. Preaching and insisting on love can indeed help avert the dangers of terrorism and ensure that people love others as they love themselves.

Body

The body supports the thesis statement and builds on it. When writing a speech, it is important to have topic sentences that represent the main points that support the main theme. These need to stand out, and the audience needs to know when the speaker is going through them.

Conclusion

How to finish a speech is not a challenging task. When writing a conclusion for a speech, the writer needs to recap the highlights of a speech. A summary of the speech’s core message makes up a speech conclusion.

Tips for speech writing

There are different speech writing tips and if adhered to can help one to deliver a high-quality speech. Things like the choice of vocabulary and understanding the theme of the event are of great importance when writing a speech, but other tips can help writers to write high quality and relevant speeches.

Below are some tips for an effective speech:

  • Be memorable –In some occasions, the audience only remembers a single line from a speech. It is, therefore, important to condense the speech’s theme into a few words that the audience can easily remember.
  • Avoid wasting the opening – Audiences are most receptive during the opening stages of speech. However, some speech writers waste the opportunity of maintaining them by starting low. It is thus essential to include shocking facts or make a joke or start with a question and in some instances to engage the audience by seeking answers to the question.
  • Maintain eye contact –making and maintaining eye contact is a strategy that speakers can use toengage their audience personally.
  • Always speak of things that mean something to you –this induces passion as well as originality. It is easy for an audience to tell when someone is faking it but when they see and feel the speaker’s passion for a particular subject, they get hooked and offer their full attention.
  • Repeat yourself –Emphasis is indeed of great importance. The speech’s keywords, theme, as well as phrases should always be reinforced. This also helps to make the speech more memorable.

Speech sample

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