Schools Kill Creativity Essay

  • Schooling offers more knowledge.

    Even though public school curriculums are strictly structured, the knowledge children obtain from the holing builds a platform for new innovative thinking. One example of creativity not being killed is that most high school grads that go onto college are dissed into many different majors. If public schools killed creativity and made us all think the same, we would all take the same major.

  • Schools do not destroy creativity. Schools may not offer enough art classes, but they certainly don't destroy it.

    People destroy their own creativity. The high school I go to is a science and technology school and yet we have three art murals and tons of music and art classes that anyone can take. If a person isn't a naturally creative person, then they just won't be throughout life.

    Don't blame the school. This is the technology age so the schools are just preparing you for reality. But school isn't trying to take away your creative spirit. I'm a senior and I haven't taken art since freshman year yet I still love to draw and I still use my brain.

  • They give us a platform

    While being in school we tend to know certain things which we didnt knew before. These things are called basics. After learning these basics we tend to use our imagination to create wonders. The modern marvels are products of these basics collaborated with our creativity . So schools rather than killing our creativity provides us a platform where we can nurture ourselves to be more creative and imaginative.

  • Creativity refers to the ability to think differently

    The education system does not kill our creativity but instead in my opinion it improves the quality of our thinking. It structures out thinking and gives us the freedom to formulate our own opinions.It helps us alter our thinking and express our thoughts and emotions in a healthy way. It helps us dream wonder and imagine.

  • School give students a chance for learning something new. And it provide students creativity.

    I don't think this opinion that school kill creativity. Because school provide us(students) new information and knowledge that we don't know previously, after students understand this, they create new things based on the old more easily. For example, if you learn literature, you take chance to write poem or fiction. If not, because young people don't go to school, he or she has difficult to know literature. Not only this case, but also in many field, students take chance to improve their creativity in school.

  • Creativity in the classroom comes down to the teachers creativity.

    Im an art teacher, I work alongside another art teacher who also teaches mathematics. You would think that a subject like maths would discourage creativity, but what has opened my eyes is when this art teacher teaches maths he had the students create graphs on the floor using masking tape and allows them to go outside and give them the freedom to learn where they are not strapped to their desks and with this their marks reflect. I believe that it is not the school, or the subjects that kill creativity, but the teachers and the way the teachers are educated to teach.
    We all need to understand and develop new ways to educate the next generation which is innovative and exciting in order to nurture the creativity, not repress it.

  • "kill" really? Definitely doesn't "kill" creativity.

    While you may (correctly) argue that school is not necessarily a place which inspires or develops creativity. It definitely does not kill it. I don't find school creatively stimulating, however I don't allow it to stifle my creative side. I merely pursue it outside of school (for me its photography). It is an uncreative person who allows school to "kill" their creativity.

    In any event I personally think that school actually gives us the tools which helps drive our creative side. For example teaching a painter different ways of using the brush and achieving what they want. Or teaching a composer various instruments so that he is in a better place to compose from. Or equipping a person who enjoys poetry with a fine vocabulary, so that they may pursue their creative side of writing more effectively.

    When whinge about school killing their creativity it makes me sick, as it clearly shows a lack of imagination and is really just an excuse for their laziness. Please get off your arse and make an effort to pursue your creative side rather than finding excuses.

  • Courses to learn and further knowledge in new ways

    In my high school we have an IB program which amerces people in a different way of learning and thinking about problems. There are also many courses such as economics and Theory of Knowledge which question the ways which any given student looks at a situation and makes them have their own creative interpretation. I think that with all the elective courses you can take, students have a great opportunity to express creativity at school.

  • Ha ha ha

    As a student and a creative writer, I believe it does. It's obvious that a structured environment tends to stunt creativity. Students are expected to follow tried-and-true methods instead of creating their own. This is often the case even in subjects like literature, where students are often given strict guidelines for writing things like short stories and poems. My poetry assignments in eighth grade had precise rules for each individual line, making poetry seem very constricted and uncreative.

    This effect is amplified by our age's emphasis on STEM, which encourages people to take these structured classes. Through this school system's limited opportunities to expand creativity, talented students are given few opportunities to expand their creative abilities.

    Part of it is the psychological effects of school as well. In today's academic environment, being wrong is one of the worst things that can happen to you. Students are taught that there is only one correct answer, and anything else means that you're wrong. This leads to a “I’m just not good at it” mindset, which is common in many students today.

    That’s completely untrue. Talent has nothing to do with it; all it takes is desire and time. I can testify that everyone has potential to be creative, and all you need is some way to unlock it. As an elementary school student, I had no interest in creative works whatsoever. In fact, I thought that I was far from creative. I had an unhealthy obsession with video games that dominated every aspect of my being.

    I didn’t start writing until fifth grade, when an everyday moment inspired me to try writing. It wasn’t an “Aha!” moment or anything like that. It just involved a journal entry about a guy named Bob.

    So I tried writing. I started out horrible. What do you expect? When you try something out for the first time, it won’t be easy to do it well. It's not that you "can't do it".

    The thing is, students don’t realize that because school has completely erased that from their heads.

    Sure, you can argue that school doesn't kill creativity because of liberal arts electives and stuff like that. But that's not necessarily helpful. At the end of the day, any one high school student might take maybe one or two semesters of a class specializing in their preferred art - alongside six years of structure.

    As I mentioned before, I'm an aspiring writer. In the five years I’ve been writing, I’ve written four novels. Out of those four, I only consider one of them decent enough to be published. Because school never trained me to write fiction, I had to use a trial-and-error method to build up my skills.

    But isn't school supposed to prepare us for the future? Even in our STEM-conquered lives, creativity is necessary. These days, a new piece of technology isn't interesting because it's new; instead, it's interesting because it brings something new to the table.

  • Ha ha ha

    As a student and a creative writer, I believe it does. It's obvious that a structured environment tends to stunt creativity. Students are expected to follow tried-and-true methods instead of creating their own. This is often the case even in subjects like literature, where students are often given strict guidelines for writing things like short stories and poems. My poetry assignments in eighth grade had precise rules for each individual line, making poetry seem very constricted and uncreative.

    This effect is amplified by our age's emphasis on STEM, which encourages people to take these structured classes. Through this school system's limited opportunities to expand creativity, talented students are given few opportunities to expand their creative abilities.

    Part of it is the psychological effects of school as well. In today's academic environment, being wrong is one of the worst things that can happen to you. Students are taught that there is only one correct answer, and anything else means that you're wrong. This leads to a “I’m just not good at it” mindset, which is common in many students today.

    That’s completely untrue. Talent has nothing to do with it; all it takes is desire and time. I can testify that everyone has potential to be creative, and all you need is some way to unlock it. As an elementary school student, I had no interest in creative works whatsoever. In fact, I thought that I was far from creative. I had an unhealthy obsession with video games that dominated every aspect of my being.

    I didn’t start writing until fifth grade, when an everyday moment inspired me to try writing. It wasn’t an “Aha!” moment or anything like that. It just involved a journal entry about a guy named Bob.

    So I tried writing. I started out horrible. What do you expect? When you try something out for the first time, it won’t be easy to do it well. It's not that you "can't do it".

    The thing is, students don’t realize that because school has completely erased that from their heads.

    Sure, you can argue that school doesn't kill creativity because of liberal arts electives and stuff like that. But that's not necessarily helpful. At the end of the day, any one high school student might take maybe one or two semesters of a class specializing in their preferred art - alongside six years of structure.

    As I mentioned before, I'm an aspiring writer. In the five years I’ve been writing, I’ve written four novels. Out of those four, I only consider one of them decent enough to be published. Because school never trained me to write fiction, I had to use a trial-and-error method to build up my skills.

    But isn't school supposed to prepare us for the future? Even in our STEM-conquered lives, creativity is necessary. These days, a new piece of technology isn't interesting because it's new; instead, it's interesting because it brings something new to the table.

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    Introduction

    School as an institution is a place where students gather to learn the different concepts that may be available for them (Novak). It is an institution where the children get the opportunity to learn based on the educational curriculum that is available for the same. Students tend to get a chance to interact with the teachers who would teach them in the different subject areas (Biggs). There has been a debate on the concept of whether the school does kill the creativity of the students. However, in addressing the issue, it could be mandatory to take a deeper understanding of the primary purpose of the school. By understanding the same, it would help one determine whether the school indeed has any significant impact on the creativity of the student. There are different opinions regarding the ability of the school to preserve the creativity of the children. Some would argue that the institution does nothing but kill the overall creativity of the child while others would argue that school has taken on appropriate measures to preserve and promote the creativity of the students.

    Creativity of the Child

    Creativity refers to the ability of a student to come up with ideas that can provide a deeper understanding of a particular concept. It could be the critical aspect of thinking that gives one a better understanding of a particular subject matter. In most instances, the students would have a deeper understanding of the content and be analytical in the approach that they are giving the particular topic. The question of whether school kills or promotes the creativity of the child depends on the changes that could be witnessed by the child in addressing the particular subject area.

    Sir Ken Robinson challenges the ability of the schools to promote the creativity of the children. According to him, the education system does not address the contemporary issues about the educational curriculum. The author provides evidence regarding doubt over the educational system and the way it fails to enhance the ability of the students to be creative in their thinking. Similarly, the writer presents arguments by giving examples of the artists who never performed well while in school. In his argument, he states that most of the artists who were not good in class work can perform well the moment they engage in other activities. Further, the author reiterates that they were able to build a legacy for themselves despite not being able to build the same while they were in school.

    Comparing academic performance, most of the successful artists never excelled in their academics. What happened is that most of them were poor in class. However, when it came to the exploration of their talent, for instance in the music industry, many were able to build a legacy for themselves. The same cannot be a comparison of how they perform in their academic works. It is for the same reason that one would argue for the credibility of the school systems and the ability to make the students realize their fullest potential while in class.

    Robinson expresses his sentiments in different ways by having to explain that most of those educated barely have the concept in their heads but are not able to transform the world. The few who have been successful are the artists who have made significant changes in the way the world runs.

    Impact of School on the Overall Performance of Students

    The sentiments presented by Robinson further express the negative effects that school has had on the overall performance of the children while in class. For example, ordinarily, school is a place where the students would meet and learn on a particular subject. After a given duration of time, they would be assessed by being given a test. The students would then be ranked based on how each of them performs in a particular subject area. Those who do well in the assessments would be in the order of the marks that they were able to achieve while in class. It is at this stage that the school does impact negatively on the creativity of the students. The students, who would not have performed better, tend to lose confidence in them. They see themselves as not being capable of handling any academic works. For the same reason, what would happen is that they would have a reduction in their self-esteem. Because of the same, a student who originally was smart in a specific field would not be able to express their prowess. It is because out of the assessment that they are ranked as being the last and because of the same, they tend to lose confidence in themselves. It is a discouraging factor, because the moment one is last in class, they end up carrying that with themselves. What happens is that they end up not being active. If they did have some talent in them, they would be shy to express the same. It is an indication of the negative impact that the school has on the creativity of the students.

    Failure of the School to Enhance Students’ Creativity

    The other concept that comes about when it comes to the inability of the school to enhance the creativity of the children does arise when one is under pressure to give a right answer to the questions that is asked in class. Robinson provides an example of children. If a teacher asks a particular student a question, most of them will not hesitate to give an answer. In fact, they would give an answer even if they are not sure that whatever answer they are giving is wrong (Robinson). For example, most would not start thinking if they are giving the right or the wrong answer. They would go ahead to give their thoughts on the questions that may have been asked. However, as the children join the schooling system, what would happen is that the confidence would start diminishing. Particularly, as they advance in their classes, most of them are willing to take part in the class discussions. The same can be confirmed at the event where they are asked to give a particular answer by the teacher in class. Few students would raise their hands to give a response to the questions that could have been asked (Robinson). Comparing to a time when they were children, they would not hesitate to give an answer that they think is right or wrong. Most have the fear that the answer they give is wrong and would rather prefer to keep quiet with the same. It is an indication of the detrimental aspect that the school does on the overall performance of the students in class.

    Additionally, the school has failed in promoting the ability of the students to think of themselves because of different reasons. The school does treat students as robots. One is expected to get into class and work towards the achievement of grades. It is a notion that has been inculcated among the society. For example, many have the understanding that once one is in school, what would happen is that they have to go through a particular system. They have to read and know how to answer the questions that may have been set. Little thought is given to how the students are able to grasp the content. The educators are focused on ensuring that the students are able to get the highest grades at the end of term or semester. Little regard has been given to the ability of the students to think beyond the education that they are being given. Further, it is not considered whether the students would able to apply whatever they did learn in class.

    The ability of the school to kill the creativity of the students is further portrayed by the fact that they do not apply what they learned in class in the real life situation. It is an indication of the failure of the education to adequately address the issues that may affect the students (Elmore et al.). If the students are taught in a way that they can address the contemporary issues relating to education, it would be possible to have the children be creative enough in their approach to various issues.

    Role of School in Killing the Creativity

    The role played by the school in killing the creativity of the students has further been portrayed by the emphasis that is depicted by the emphasis that has been put on academic excellence. Interest has been diverted more on the grades that are in the transcripts rather than the holistic development of the student (Robinson). Because of the same, most of the schools would gather all the materials that are needed to ensure that the students do perform in academics. It is a trend in the negative direction since the creation of the students is halted. Few schools have taken the initiative of promoting creativity and imagination amongst the students. They only prefer what the students get regarding the grades that are in the transcript. It is a huge problem that the society would have to struggle to get a solution because of the impact that the same has on the development of the students (Ricci 450).

    The decision to focus on the academic performance of the children puts undue pressure on the children. Those who are not able to perform well in class would most likely end up getting stressed because they are not able to match the ability of the good performers (Morrison, Holly and Dana 440). Most of them would end up in peer groups and start engaging in drugs abuse to help cope with the aspect of not being able to perform. It is a problem because much of the emphasis had been put on the performance of the students rather than the inability of them to be creative and explore their potential. It is an issue that needs to be addressed as many of the students are losing to the failure of the school institutions.

    The school and the entire educational system have killed the ingenuity of the students and the way they think. It is because most of the children have been taught how to act and respond in one particular way. In the event that most of the children fail to act as they have been taught, the chances are high that they would be punished (Robinson). Because of the same, most of the children have no option but to act and behave in a precise manner that the educational system has prescribed for them to behave. Further, those who perform better would be rewarded. It could be through monetary terms or sometimes being offered some incentives. Therefore, most of the students would fail to be creative and instead resort to working hard in class so that they would be able to get some of the incentives the top performers are given in class. 

    Robinson does identify that under normal circumstances, the children are not wrong in how they address the issues they face. However, as they spend more time in school, most of them end up developing a negative attitude. They adopt a school phobia and begin doubting their capability to handle the different issues that may be affecting them. By doing so, the children are cut out of the ability to be creative thinkers because of how their educational system is designed. It calls for the need to introduce appropriate measures within the school set up that would serve to promote the ability of the students to be creative thinkers rather than zombies in class waiting to be graded.

    Works Cited

    Biggs, John B. Teaching for Quality Learning at University: What the Student Does. McGraw-Hill Education (UK), 2011.

    Morrison, Kristan A., Holly H. Robbins, and Dana Gregory Rose. "Operationalizing Culturally Relevant Pedagogy. A Synthesis Of Classroom-Based Research." Equity & Excellence in Education 41.4 (2008): 433-452. Print.

    Novak, Joseph D. Learning, Creating, and Using Knowledge: Concept Maps as Facilitative Tools in Schools and Corporations. Routledge, 2010.

    Ricci, Carlo. "The Case Against Standardized Testing and the Call for a Revitalization Of Democracy." The Review of Education, Pedagogy 26.4 (2004): 339-361. Print.

    Robinson, Ken. Out of our minds: Learning to be creative. John Wiley & Sons, 2011.

    Robinson, Ken. "Do Schools Kill creativity?" February 2015. 

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